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Rene A Cranston

from Shorewood, WI
Age ~54

Rene Cranston Phones & Addresses

  • 4367 Marlborough Dr, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (414) 961-0378
  • Shorewood, WI
  • Grafton, WI
  • Port Washington, WI
  • 3409 64Th St, Seattle, WA 98116 (206) 938-1692
  • Burien, WA
  • Seahurst, WA
  • Random Lake, WI
  • Dysart, IA
  • Keswick, IA
  • Westminster, CA
  • 2196 Stonecroft Dr, Grafton, WI 53024 (414) 961-0378

Work

Position: Production Occupations

Education

Degree: High school graduate or higher

Resumes

Resumes

Rene Cranston Photo 1

Ice Arena Manager At Usm

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Position:
Ice Arena Manager at USM
Location:
Greater Milwaukee Area
Industry:
Sports
Work:
USM
Ice Arena Manager
Rene Cranston Photo 2

Owner, Ttp Sports And Marketing Ultimate Sports Attire, Creator Of The Attack Triangle & Attack Pad

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Location:
Grafton, Wisconsin
Industry:
Sports
Work:
ttpsports 1999 - 2013
owner

University School of Milwaukee Jul 2002 - Mar 2011
Ice Arena Director
Rene Cranston Photo 3

Gm At Usm

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Position:
GM at USM
Location:
Greater Milwaukee Area
Industry:
Sports
Work:
USM
GM

Publications

Us Patents

Hockey Training Device

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US Patent:
6165084, Dec 26, 2000
Filed:
Jul 8, 1999
Appl. No.:
9/350253
Inventors:
Rene A. Cranston - Seattle WA
International Classification:
A63B 6900
US Classification:
473422
Abstract:
A hockey training device comprising a frame with skate-like and hockey stick-like members attached thereto, simulating an opposing player. This training device is intended to assist the novice hockey player in developing the skills associated with maneuvering the hockey puck around and/or through an opponent, and forces the novice to concentrate on the triangle presented by the skates and hockey stick of the opponent. The device consists of a frame supporting two downwardly disposed legs having skate-like elements attached, and a third leg having a stick-like element attached. The skate-like elements and stick-like elements have coplanar lower edges so that the entire device may be placed on the ice, resting on these edges. The frame may be weighted, and drag-inducing spikes may be incorporated into the skate-like elements to affect the motion of the device on the ice.
Rene A Cranston from Shorewood, WI, age ~54 Get Report